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                                 and it shows!

(425) 557-0752

Beaver Lake Animal Hospital
26325 SE 39th Street
Issaquah, WA 98029
(425)557-0752


Beaver Lake Animal Hospital

26325 SE 39th Street
Issaquah, WA 98029

(425)557-0752

beaverlakeah.com

Ophthalmology


 

We see many types of eye problems in dogs and cats.  Fortunately many are easy to diagnose and treat.  We refer to Dr. Jones at Northwest Eye Clinic in Kirkland for any ocular problem that is not fairly basic or not responding to initial treatment.


  Epiphora is a common problem.  Epiphora is basically tears that fall on the face instead of flowing into the lacrimal punta and ducts.  We see epiphora commonly in small dogs and in dogs with short faces.  There are a variety of reasons including the ducts may not be patent (open) or are blocked.  Some patients with epiphora will resolve the problem or improve with flushing of the lacrimal punta (openings for tears to enter the ducts).  Epiphora can cause a maceration (destruction by moisture) of the skin if not cared for properly and regularly.
This is the third eyelid and the nictitans gland with a follicular conjunctivitis.  This is a relatively common problem and luckily normally resonds well to treatment. 
Eyelid margin tumors are common in dogs.  Most are benign.  Although the sutures are visible on this case, in most cases the sutures are so small magnification is needed to see them.  Most dogs don't even seem to be bothered post operatively.  We recommend histopathology (biopsy) for all masses around the eyes to be certain of the diagnosis.
 
Before           After
 This pup has a scrolled cartilage of the 3rd eyelid.  The cartilage is weak. Instead of functioning to help protect the eye it becomes a source of inflammation and or infection.  Removal of the defective tissue helps the eye remain healthy.  
Entropion is the condition of the eyelid rolling inward. Entropion can allow pain, infection and trauma to the cornea and other ocular tissues.  In this case, this is from redundant skin on and around the face.  Not the folded lower eyelid.  
  Unfortunately for this puppy (same pup as above) the entropion lead to an ulceration of the cornea. The ulcer is stained with fluroscein here.  The eye was painful. In this picture the eyelid has been stretched out to 'reduce' the entropion.
The eyelid was temporarily tacked down to prevent the entropion to allow the ulcer to heal.  Note that the entropion has been corrected - the eyelid is not rolling in.
Referral for entropion correction surgery was given due to the extreme redundant facial skin common to the breed.  When the puppy was old enough a surgery was completed (by the ophthalmologist) to correct for the entropion.  Entropion surgery can be completed at Beaver Lake Animal hospital and is one of the surgeries that Dr. Bennett enjoys completing.
 
 No Description This is a different dog than the one above. This dog first visited after having an unresolving eye problem.  We found a partial thickness corneal ulcer with a flap over it.  We cauterized it and opened the superficial flap to allow antibiotics to reach the base of the infection.  Four days later the pup is much improved.