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                                 and it shows!

Beaver Lake Animal Hospital
26325 SE 39th Street
Issaquah, WA 98029
(425)557-0752


Beaver Lake Animal Hospital

26325 SE 39th Street
Issaquah, WA 98029

(425)557-0752

beaverlakeah.com

 

Surgery


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Well equiped for soft tissue and orthopedic surgeries.

Surgical suite is used only for surgery.

The table is heated to help maintain normal body temperature.

The surgeon is fully scrubbed, capped, masked and gowned.

Supplies are single use, sterile and of high quality.

Click here to view or print a copy of Standard Spay/Neuter Information.

Please see the Consumer Guide to Elective Surgery and Procedures.



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We use the Cardell 9405 monitor in our surgery room to assist us in insuring a safe anesthesia and surgery for your pet.  For comfort we use an electrocardiogram leads that will not pinch the pet.  Blood pressure, heart rate and respiration rate are all monitored.  For more critical patients we can monitor other vital sign parameters.
Our surgery table is electric which allows for the top to warm to assist in patient needs.  Patients lose body temperature rapidly if not provided with appropriate warmth. The table also adjusts with just a simple foot petal for the doctor to adjust the height as may be needed.
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We use iv fluid warmers on all our anesthetized patients to help keep their body temperatures normal.  After all if their iv fluids are room temperature you can see how they would readily become chilled.  The fluid warmers warm then to a safe temperature.
We have a variety of surgery packs.  In our sterile surgeries such as ovariohysterectomies (spay) or neuters we use basic packs. Each patient will have a new pack used for them.  The instruments have all been throughly cleaned, lubricated, precisely packed and autoclaved. 
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For orthopedic surgeries we will select from some of our more special instruments.  This is a picture of the additional instruments used when we complete surgery to correct for luxating (dislocating) patella (kneecap) a common problem in small dogs.


This surgery was to remove a chewed up sock. The chewed sock had stretched out. Part of it was stuck in the stomach. The intestine bunched up (plication) trying to get the object to travel through it.  The intestines were becoming inflammed and infected.  Surgery was successful and the dog was released to go about 2 days later.
   This obese cat developed bladder stones. 
The bladder has been opened, the stones removed. The urethra and bladder were flushed prior to closing.

Pets prone to uroliths may quickly and easily redevelop them if a proper diet is not fed - exclusively.  Uroliths are sent to the lab for analysis to determine what they are and to help determine the diet needed to prevent recurrance of urolithiasis. 

Feeding canned food exclusively is particularly helpful in preventing uroliths.
 
 
   This was a cystotomy for a solitary urolith. The bladder is already closed.
 Although lipomas are benign, they may develop anywhere on or in a patient.  This dog had one on his front arm.  It was between the musculature but under the blood vessel we favor for collecting blood and giving iv injections and placing catheters.   
  This is the post operative view with the typical lipoma included.